|

Fence: July 26, 2012

by Jody G. Holthaus
Meadowlark Extension Agent
Livestock & Natural Resources

Coming home last night from Marysville, via Frankfort, I could see it raining and I could smell the rain! I’m happy that someone is getting rain. Our gauge registered zip.

Coming home last night from Marysville, via Frankfort, I could see it raining and I could smell the rain! I’m happy that someone is getting rain. Our gauge registered zip.

Coming home last night from Marysville, via Frankfort, I could see it raining and I could smell the rain! I’m happy that someone is getting rain. Our gauge registered zip.

This is just getting so depressing. I see folks feeding hay in the pastures and hauling water to their cattle. I’ve heard that trying to find a protein tub can be a shopping adventure. Surprisingly, the droughty corn that we’ve sent to the lab has lower nitrates than we thought. This doesn’t mean that you can just turn the cows out and assume yours is safe too.

Before feeding any droughty corn hay, green chop or silage you should have it tested. One of the things I’ve learned throughout the last few weeks, is a slick way to figure tonnage on standing corn. If you measure the stalk, under the tassel and to your cutting height (12-15 inches), for every foot of stalk you can figure a ton of silage.

So if you’ve got a 5-foot stalk, minus 2 feet for tassel and the 12-inch cutting height, that leaves 3 feet, or 3 ton per acre. This is assuming 30-inch row spacing and normal plant population.

Of course, the other rule of thumb to price standing corn, it’s usually eight times the cost of a bushel of corn, but droughty corn is only 6 to 6.5 times the cost of a bushel of corn. That is a starting point. Because there will be challenges with little or no corn, smaller tonnages for the same cost of ensiling and the chances of high nitrate, the price should be negotiated.

Producers in the southern part of Kansas are discussing feeding trees to the cattle. So in that perspective we are lucky to have at least part of the corn crop that can be salvaged for feed.

Short URL: http://www.jeffcountynews.com/?p=13907

Posted by on Aug 4 2012. Filed under Columns, Fenceline. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Comments are closed

Recently Commented