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Drought conditions worsen as temperatures stay near triple digits

It’s been a hot and dry spring and summer. Crops are severely damaged and grass for cattle is in short supply.

Connie Bryant, Oskaloosa, had a bottle of water and some shade as she walked the Square during the recent heat wave. Photo by Dennis Sharkey

Connie Bryant, Oskaloosa, had a bottle of water and some shade as she walked the Square during the recent heat wave. Photo by Dennis Sharkey

It began with a winter that brought one 2-inch snow and started to warm early. April 2 was a 90-degree day and there was a string of 80s in March.

Temperatures in the 90s were the rule for May and June and the first day in triple digits was June 24 when it hit 102.

It remained over 100 degrees F from June 27 through July 7, followed by upper 90s and 100 again July 14 and 16.

Local weatherman Tom Ryan III has recorded temperatures in excess of 100 stretching through Monday and they were predicted to continue at least a couple more days for almost two weeks of it with only a couple of exceptions when it dipped to 98 or 99.

Gov. Sam Brownback last week sent a letter to U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack requesting that USDA issue disaster declarations for 37 additional counties in Kansas because of drought, extreme heat, high winds and wildfires. Jefferson County was on the list as are 103 of the state’s 105 counties.

U.S. Senator Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) said USDA has announced additional Kansas counties will be eligible for emergency haying and grazing of Conservation Reserve Program land due to severe drought. This action brings the total to 104 counties. Marshall County is the only Kansas county that has not applied for assistance.

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Posted by on Aug 2 2012. Filed under Valley Falls. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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