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School required immunizations

by Debbie McNary RN, Public Health Director
Jefferson County Health Department

 

Don’t wait until the last minute! Make sure your child is ready to start school next month by obtaining all immunizations required for school attendance. It is especially important to review your child’s immunization record if he or she will be entering kindergarten or 7th grade.

Make sure your child is ready to start school next month by obtaining all immunizations required for school attendance.

Make sure your child is ready to start school next month by obtaining all immunizations required for school attendance.

All kindergarten children are required to have the appropriate number of the following immunizations: DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis), IPV (polio), MMR (measles, mumps, rubella), Varicella (chickenpox), and Hepatitis B.

All 7th graders are required to have one dose of Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis). While boosting tetanus and diphtheria immunity this dose also protects against pertussis, otherwise known as whooping cough. There are currently outbreaks of pertussis across the country including the state of Kansas.

All 7th and 8th graders are required to have two doses of varicella (chickenpox) vaccine. If your child has had chickenpox disease and the disease is documented by a physician signature, vaccine is not needed. Without a physician signature, vaccine is required even if you believe your child has had chickenpox disease.

Other vaccines are available to protect your child against meningitis and HPV. These important vaccines are recommended for all children 11 years of age and older; however they are not required for school attendance.

Meningitis vaccine protects against serious meningococcal bacterial disease which is an infection of the covering of the brain and the spinal cord. Meningitis may be fatal, and a significant number of people who survive disease are left with permanent disabilities.

HPV vaccine protects against the highest risk strains of HPV (human papillomavirus). This is the most common sexually transmitted virus in the United States. If given before exposure to the virus, this vaccine can prevent most cases of cervical cancer in females, and genital warts in both males and females.

Immunizations may be obtained from your child’s primary care provider or your local health department. The Jefferson County Health Department provides walk-in immunization services on Tuesdays and Fridays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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Posted by on Jul 23 2012. Filed under Schools. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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